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We Robot: Getting Down to Business

Agenda

Monday, April 8, 2013

9:00 Introductory Remarks

9:15-10:45  Panel: Robotics and Intellectual Property

Speakers: Mark Lemley, Christian Hicks, Julie Samuels

Moderator: Brian Biddinger (Ropes & Gray LLP)

Related Papers

Robots, the DMCA, and Patents: Threats, Strategy, and Caselaw in the Aftermarket

10:45-11:00 Break

11:00-12:00 Paper: Human Factors in Robotic Torts

Author: Bryant Walker Smith

Commentator: Josh Blackman

12:00-1:00 Lunch Break (on your own)

1:00-2:00  Paper: Do Robots Dream of Electric Laws? An Experiment in Law as Algorithm

Author:  Greg Conti, Woodrow Hartzog

Moderator: Harry Surden

2:00-2:45 Robot Demo

Speaker:  Ian Danforth

2:45-3:45 Paper: A Licensing Approach to Regulation of Open Robotics

Author: Diana Marina Cooper

Commentator: Michael Froomkin

3:45-4:00  Break

4:00-5:00 Presentation: Bender’s Law

Speaker: Futurama Co-Producer Patric Verrone

5:00  Reception

 

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

9:00-10:00  Paper: The Application of Traditional Tort Theory to Machine Learning

Author: Judge Curtis Karnow

Commentator: Woodrow Barfield

10:00-10:15 Break

10:15-11:15  Paper: Risk Management in Commercializing Robots

Author: Stephen Wu

Commentator: Julie Martin

11:15 – 12:15  Robotics Industry Roundtable

Speakers: Leila Takayama (Willow Garage), Chris Mailey (AUVSI), Dan Siciliano (Stanford Rock Center)

Moderator: Steve Henn (NPR)

12:15 -1:15 Lunch (on your own)

1:15-2:45 Panel: Designing Values

Speakers: Ergun Calisgan, AJung Moon, Aneta Podsiadla

Moderator: Ian Kerr

Related Papers

Open Roboethics Pilot: Accelerating Policy Design, Implementation and Demonstration of Socially Acceptable Robot Behaviors

What Robotics Can Learn from the Contemporary Problems of Information Technologies Sector- Compliance and Enforcement of Privacy by Design

2:45-3:00  Break

3:00-4:30  Panel: Off The War Path

 

Speakers: Kenneth Anderson, Matthew Waxman, Peter Asaro

Moderator: Ryan Calo

Related Papers

Programming Robotic Decisions with Potentially Lethal Outcomes: Comparing Self-Driving Cars and Autonomous Weapon Systems, and How They Should Be Regulated as Their Autonomous Capabilities Evolve

On Banning Autonomous Weapon Systems: Human Rights, Automation, and the Dehumanization of Lethal Decision-Making

4:30 Closing Remarks